Values From Bordeaux’s Left Bank

Spanish Table Seattle & Paris Grocery Newsletter

March 11, 2010

Among French appellations scrambling to sell wine during the recession, Bordeaux is perhaps the region struggling the hardest. Prices of older wines are being slashed as newer vintages are released, providing a great opportunity to load up on delicious bottles that were previously unaffordable. We’ve brought in four new red wines from the left bank, primarily Cabernet Sauvignon blends, which we think are steals.

2006 Domaine Lapalu “La Patache” Médoc ($14.99) A blend of 85% Cabernet Sauvignon harvested from different parcels of the Lapalu family’s vineyards, the fruit has been skillfully selected and blended. A lively, juicy Bordeaux that is approachable in its youth, it also has an ability to develop with age. It is deep ruby, aromatic with strong notes of cassis and plum supported by dusty tannins and softer notes of vanilla. Wonderful as an accompaniment to roasts, it is also delicious all on its own!

2006 Sorbey Haut-Médoc ($14.99) The second label of the prestigious Chateau Julien, Chateau Sorbey uses grapes from the same gravel vineyards to create outstandingly priced Médoc wine. This 50% Cabernet Sauvignon, 50% Merlot shows great minerality and balance. It spends at least a year maturing in oak barrels. Concentrated, nicely structured, with chewy black fruit and hints of spice and cedar. Delicious with lamb crusted in herbs and lavender.

2007 Chateau Semonlon Haut-Médoc ($15.99) Olivier Dumora inherited this small estate, which sits very close to Margaux, from his great-grandfather. The gravel and mud soil of the area is known for its finesse, and Dumora respects the terroir and pays homage to the traditional winemaking style of Bordeaux. All the fruit is harvested by hand and fermented in stainless steel tanks, followed by a year of aging in both cement vats and in oak barrels. The 35-year-old vines of Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot yield a supple wine with deep notes of black currant, plum, and earth. Medium-bodied with balanced acidity and tannins, it is very appealing now but can also be cellared for a couple of years.

2005 Château Bibian Listrac-Médoc ($24.99) Julien Meyre, winemaker at Chateau Bibian, stopped in at Paris Grocery last week with his wonderful wines. From clay and limestone vineyards with deep pockets of gravel, the 2005 vintage was the estate’s best bottling since 1990! 55% Merlot, 30% Cabernet Sauvignon and 15% Petit Verdot, it was kept 6 months in French oak. Full-bodied, it shows exceptional structure. The ripe black fruit is persistent, and balanced by notes of the terroir: graphite, pencil lead and chalk. Incredibly delicious and a great addition to your cellar. “Rich and layered, with blackberry, currant and toasty oak on the nose and palate. Full and silky-textured, with a long finish.” 90 points Wine Spectator

NEW CHEESES AND FOODS AT PARIS GROCERY

 

Soumaintrain – A cow’s milk cheese from Yonne in northern Burgundy, the wheels are washed with brine and marc de Bourgogne. Pungent, gooey, rich, mushroomy, and barnyardy- some even say it displays umami. Try it with a Chablis for a blissful experience. $25.99/wheel

Comté de Fruitière -A raw cow’s milk cheese from the Jura, aged 5-6 months. A delicious fruit nectar aroma and a more delicate nuttiness than more aged comté. Almost sweet and bursting with flavors of fresh milk and butter. Great in salads or with fruit! $16.99/lb

Tomme Haut Berry -From a remote and arid region of southwestern France, this sheep’s milk cheese has a firm yet creamy texture. An aroma of spring wildflowers and a bright flavor that is both sweet and acidic make this cheese a new favorite. $28.99/lb

Saint Nectaire Fermier -A fermier (farmstead) version of an ancient style of cheese. Made with the milk of Salers cows who graze on the volcanic pastures of Auvergne, this cheese has all the earthiness, nuttiness, and raw milk flavor a cheese can possess! Pair with a light, fruity Gamay.

 Tarbais Beans— the traditional bean for cassoulet! $17.99/lb. We now have the full line of Clément Faugier chestnut products– chestnut cream with vanilla, chestnut puree, and whole chestnuts in water. Traou Mad de Pont Aven cookies from Brittany– made with salted butter, these thick biscuits are supremely dunk-worthy!

And, Salted Black Licorice is now in stock!

NEW WINES AND FOODS FROM SPANISH TABLE

 

2006 Bodegas Emina Crianza Ribera del Duero ($15.99) “…aged for 12 months in French and American oak. Purple colored, it offers an attractive perfume of cedar, vanilla, violets, coffee, blueberry, and blackberry. This leads to a layered, up-front, forward wine with excellent depth and concentration. It will evolve for 1-2 years but this lengthy, tasty effort can be enjoyed now.” 89 points Wine Advocate

2008 Altovinum Evodia, Calatayud ($9.99) “Fresh strawberry and raspberry aromas are deepened by notes of licorice, black tea and pungent herbs. Supple in texture, offering sweet red fruit flavors and showing no rough edges. A smoky note comes up with air, adding complexity to a nicely persistent, red berry-dominated finish. Extremely easy to drink, and offering excellent depth and clarity for the money.” 89 points Stephen Tanzer

2004 Obra Crianza, Ribera del Duero ($12.99) The 2005 Obra Tinto was an excellent and food-friendly red which sold out all too quickly last fall. When we tasted the 2004 Obra Crianza, we were impressed by its heft and structure which opens up after extended airing to reveal concentrated boysenberry liqueur, spice box and notes of cedar. This delicious full-bodied wine is best after decanting.

We unloaded 4 pallets of new products on Tuesday at Spanish Table! Some of the tastiest are Mamia brand Piquillo peppers stuffed with Hake and Shrimp or Salt Cod, Tonnino Yellowfin Tuna Fillets with Jalapeño in Olive Oil – Makes a spicy tuna sandwich! Anko White Asparagus Mousse – Spread on crostini for a great tapa. Tukas Stuffed Vine Leaves from Turkey – Vegetarian, with rice, lemon and spices. Acćent Seasoning packets with Cilantro and Achiote – adds color and flavoring and a touch of Central America to chicken dishes. Spanish Flan – Ready to eat and does not need refrigeration. Ethiopian Shiro Powder: Made from a base of garbanzo beans, garlic, ginger, Berbere pepper and other spices. It is used to make a hearty vegetarian paste served with Injera, a traditional Ethiopian flatbread. Mix the powder with water to make a delicious spicy hummus spread, or use Shiro as a flavor ingredient in other dishes such as mashed potatoes. Berbere Pepper: Quintessential spice blend in Ethiopian cooking, it is a mélange of red chili peppers with fenugreek, cardamom, ginger, garlic, nutmeg and other spices.

Shop from home on The Spanish Table’s websites!

 

Go to The Spanish Table wine website for wines arranged by staff pick, by score, by price, and by country.

For products other than wine, click on The Spanish Table to purchase food, books, cookware and other products.

Visit Paris Grocery Facebook’s page for updates on new products.

Have a great week and we’ll see you soon!

Sincerely,

 Sharon Baden and Steve Winston, Owners

The Spanish Table, 1426 Western Avenue, Seattle WA 98101 phone# 206.682.2827

Paris Grocery, 1418 Western Avenue, Seattle WA 98101 phone# 206.682.0679

Hours at both stores: Monday- Saturday, 10 AM – 6 PM. Sunday 11 AM – 5 PM

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1 Comment

Filed under Cheese, Chile, Fish, Food, france, Meat, Portugal, Red Wine, Spain

One response to “Values From Bordeaux’s Left Bank

  1. Julie

    I cannot seem to get signed up for e-mail newsletter from the Seattle store,
    please put me on your e-mail list, if possible.

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