Category Archives: Madeira

Saturday Raul Perez Tasting; Rare Madeira, Sherry & Port

Saturday Wine Tasting
On Saturday, March 12 from 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m., stop in at The Spanish Table to taste a legendary Albariño made by Raul Perez, one of Spain’s top winemakers.   Some trade veterans believe that Raul is among the handful of best winemakers in the world.   He hand makes hundreds of artisanal wines in infinitesimal quantities, so the opportunity to taste one of them is rare.  We’ll be pouring a sample of2014 Leirana Finca Genoveva Albariño, Rias Baixas ($49.00) which is 100% Albariño made from vines planted in 1862.   Aged 12 months in 4 year old foudre of 2500 liter.   The 2014 vintage has not yet been reviewed by the wine press, but the 2013 vintage scored 93 points from Stephen Tanzer/Vinous.
Rare Sherry, Port and Madeira Arrive
Lustau Emperatriz Eugenia Very Rare Oloroso, Jerez ($22.99/500 ml)  A stunning Oloroso which has not been available in our market for several years.   From a solera established in 1921 when Eugenia de Montijo (born in Granada) was the last empress of France, visited Jerez.    This Oloroso is the only bottling in the Gran Reserva series from Bodegas Lustau and it has become one of their flagship wines, with an average age of 20 years.
  Displays heady aromas of sandalwood, orange zest and smoke.  Notes of toffee, fig and nougat are viscous with a velvety texture on the palate.   Concentrated notes of dried fruit, molasses, caramelized almonds and toffee are nuanced and seamless with a hint of sweetness.  Hazelnut flavors, baking spice notes and citrus have gentle herbal notes.  The finish is dry with a briny element which adds more depth and complexity.     92 points Wine Advocate  


NV Niepoort 10 year Tawny Port, Portugal ($54.00) We’re so excited to have this revered tawny onto our shelf!   “Amazing aromas of orange and lemon peel, with hints of toffee, caramel and honey. Full-bodied and luscious, with lots of sweet fruit and a long, subtle finish that goes on and on. A benchmark for 10-year-old tawnies.”  95 points Wine Spectator
1968 D’Oliveiras Bual Madeira ($236.00)  “Balanced and plush, with concentrated buttercream, hazelnut, dried apricot and tropical fruit flavors that are still fresh and lively. Citrus zest and sea salt notes show midpalate. The finish lingers with cream, dried tarragon and Asian spice details. Drink now through 2035. 40 cases imported. ” 96 points Wine Spectator

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Filed under Albariño, Events, Madeira, Port, Portugal, Sherry, Spain, Wine

Iberian Comfort Foods, New Wines

IBERIAN COMFORT FOOD INGREDIENTS
  Chicken, simply roasted with just a few sprinkles of salt and herbs, is one of life’s great comfort foods.  Make it immeasurably better by serving it with a glass of Rioja, particularly 2007 Viña Cubillo Crianza!
  Shiitake mushrooms are superb, and in season now.   I’ve been sautéing them in garlic, fresh thyme and fino sherry, and tossing them with everything from lentils to pasta.   For a superb comfort food dish, however, combine shiitakes, chorizo and Madeira with chicken.
See The Spanish Table’s recipe below. 
New!  Basque Meat Marinade.   Basque Norte Restaurant in Chico, CA created this popular sauce in 1975 and has been serving it ever since.   Now made commercially for them by Mooney Farms in Chico, the restaurant immerses their steaks in the marinade for 10 minutes, then cooks them on a hot grill.   For more intense flavor, the meat can be marinated longer, even overnight.  Also excellent on chicken, pork or lamb.   Try it!
New Supplier, better flavor!  Medjool dates from California.  Naturally processed with no added sugar, these dates have a caramel flavor with a balanced, not overwhelming, sweetness.   Excellent for snacking or serving with cheese; also used in North African tagine recipes.
Dried limes are back in stock:  A relatively new ingredient on our shores, dried limes are a staple of Iranian and Persian Gulf cuisines.  With a sour and musky-fermented flavor, they are made by boiling fresh limes in a salt and water brine, then drying them in the sun.  They can be used whole, in soups or stews (poke the limes with a knife so the liquid can seep through and absorb the maximum flavor).
  Or break up the lime and make a seasoning powder, using a spice grinder.  It is excellent sprinkled on seafood, meat and especially lentils to punch up the flavor.

NOTABLE WINES
2013 Barco del Corneta Verdejo, Castilla y Leon $29.99) ORGANIC  100% Verdejo, made from organically grown grapes.   Barrel fermented using local yeasts and aged on its lees for 8 months.  With aromas of citrus and toast, this a creamy white wine. Rich, generous and weighty with concentrated and nuanced fruit flavors, this is a perfect winter white.  The finish is refreshing and lifted, leaving a clean citrus note on the palate.
2013 La Cartuja Priorat ($15.99)  ” (70% garnacha and 30% carinena; aged for six months in French oak): Bright violet color. A highly perfumed bouquet evokes dark berries and fresh flowers, with a spicy nuance gaining strength with air. Juicy and energetic on the palate, showing a silky texture and juicy blackberry and cassis flavors. The smooth, smoky finish shows very good clarity and a whisper of fine-grained tannins.”      90 points Stephen Tanzer
 
2011 Herdade de Rocim Mariana, Alentejano ($16.99)  My trip to Portugal last July revealed the explosion of talented winemakers and profusion of superb wines coming out of this country right now.  Herdade de Rocim fits squarely in this realm, producing excellent wines in the value-driven Alentejo region.   A blend of 30% Aragonez, 20% Syrah, 15% Alicante Bouschet and 15% Trincadeira, this is a medium-bodied red that delivers an intensity of bright red fruit.   With aromas of violets,dusty graphite notes, 2011 Mariana is precise, with a satiny finish.  Tasty!  91 points Wine Enthusist.

2011 Viña Almate, Castilla y Leon ($20.99) Natural winemaker Alfredo Maestro seeks out neglected, high altitude vineyards around Castilla y León and works them organically, using indigenous yeasts. In the cellar, Alfredo eschews all winemaking additives, including sulfur, so that his wines simply offer up a purity of fruit and a sense of place.   2011 Viña Almate is 100% tinto fino (Tempranillo), 75% from Ribera del Duero and 25% from just outside Ribera’s boundary.   Aged in neutral French oak for 2-4 months, the wine is unfined and unfiltered.   Aromas of smoke and dust are balanced by lifted black currant and marionberry fruit.   Earthy mushroom nuances have savory notes of wild herbs.  Fresh, precise and mineral driven, it has excellent structure with fine grained tannins.  This is a wine with character; savor it with jamon serrano.

CHICKEN AND SHIITAKE MUSHROOMS COOKED IN CATAPLANA
In this case, you are using the enclosed environment of the Cataplana to make a stew. (Cataplanas are available at The Spanish Table; their shell-like form clamps shut and holds in the moisture as ingredients cook).   That means you will have to be a little patient while is stews, hidden out of sight, under the lid.  While it stews away is a good time to sip some of the Madeira and a good excuse to buy something a little better than Rainwater Madeira.  A 5 year old Bual or a Malmsey would be a good selection.
Serves 2
¼ cup Olive Oil
1 choriço (or Spanish chorizo), diced
1 Yellow Onion, chopped
1 Potato, diced
1 Bay Leaf
½  pound Shiitake Mushrooms, sliced
½ pound Chicken breast, cut into strips
½ teaspoon Sea Salt
½ cup Madeira
½ cup Half-and-half
Heat oil in a large Cataplana.  Cook choriço until just starts to brown. Stir in onions and potato and cook until onions are limp. Stir in mushrooms and cook until soften. Stir in chicken and salt. Pour in Madeira, clamp down cover and cook twenty minutes. Open cataplana and stir in half-and-half just before serving.

 

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Filed under Alentejo, Basque, Cataplana, Food, Madeira, Portugal, Recipes, Red Wine, Uncategorized, Verdejo

The original American wine

Like stilettos, skinny jeans, and high-protein diets, wines go in and out of fashion. Eulogized one moment by a respected critic, a bottle, varietal, or region will often soar in popularity so that the industry must scramble to keep up with demand. Out of the spot light, anther wine will just as frequently lie untouched, collecting dust in a corner. Deservedly or not, this bottle has no buzz, no clamoring paparazzi or tweeting masses to sing its praise.  Even though it may be a genuinely good wine, this forlorn tipple might wait decades until rediscovery by a new, unprejudiced generation. I believe that Madeira is one such viticultural victim. And I also think, for myriad reasons, it is due for a second coming.

Firstly, of the so-called ‘sweet wine’ category, Madeira is unique. Aged in a hot solera system, Madeira is the only wine that is subjected to significant heat and ‘cooked’ in the winemaking process. This gives it deep caramel-rich and nougat laden notes and contributes to the wine’s phenomenal ability to age. In fact, Madeira’s requires up to fifty years maturation. Furthermore, due to its high level of acidity and cask aging—which oxidizes the wine—a good specimen of its class retains stunning brightness and life, even when it is 150 years old.

Secondly, these factors of wine-making also make Madeira an eminently user-friendly wine. Once a bottle is uncorked, it can be enjoyed for months—a virtue indeed for a sweet wine! Buy a bottle of Madeira now and enjoy it all winter long.

Thirdly, Madeira deserves a place on the American table since the history of this wine is inexorably linked to our history. The island of Madeira is located west of Morocco and was first settled by the Portuguese in the early 1400s. They lost no time in establishing vineyards and by the 1600s—while European settlement of America was still in its infancy—wine making was well established on Madeira. In 1665 British authorities banned the importation of products made or grown in Europe, unless shipped on British vessels from British ports. Goods from Madeira, however, were specifically exempted and British merchants on the island took full advantage, establishing close ties with merchants down the length of the Eastern seaboard. A steady trade developed in which wine from Madeira was traded for such American products as indigo, corn, and cotton. This trade continued unabated until the 1800s, apart from a brief interruption during the American Revolution. For two hundred years, Madeira was the wine of choice for the elite in America.

With the current revival of American bourbons, ryes, and bitters, not to mention our adoration for evoking Prohibition era aesthetics, Madeira is ripe for a renaissance. It is increasingly being sipped at table, shaken into cocktails, and used in the kitchen (try a splash with sautéed wild mushrooms—gorgeous). With a flavor profile that includes toasted almonds and hazelnuts, butterscotch and burnt caramel, turrón, nougat, cocoa and coffee, it is also startlingly bright, leaving the palate clean and fresh—the perfect finale to a good meal.

Within our diverse selection of Madeiras, some of my favorites are The Rare Wine Company’s Historic Series which highlights the four Madeira varietals and four major historical import cities. From driest to sweetest we have Charleston Sercial, Savannah Verdelho, Boston Bual, and New York Malmsy ($50).  We also carry the limited edition New Orleans Special Reserve. Inspired by a now extinct 19th century varietal, this wine relies on a blend of classic Madeira grapes to recreate the rich yet dry style of the historical Terrantez ($75). Whether you swoon for a dry, iridescent Sercial or if Malmsy’s more your style, we got many fantastic bottles in stock.

– Rachel Adams

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