Tag Archives: paella

Recaredo Cava & Cheese

RECAREDO CAVA ARRIVES

Established in 1924, Recaredo is a pioneer in the production of totally dry Spanish cavas, working with oak barrels and extended aging on the lees.

The musts from the oldest Xarello vines ferment in oak barrels, which give structure and greater complexity to Recaredo’s cavas.  Some of the base wine is also aged in oak barrels for a few months and this wine will be used to add greater finesse and structure to the final blending.

  Viticulture at Recaredo is based on dry farming, use of only estate fruit, and vineyards are certified organic and biodynamic.     The wines are meticulously produced, hand-riddled, and aged on the lees with cork stoppers.  They are disgorged manually, without freezing the necks of the bottles which provides the most natural product.   All cuvées are vintage-dated and have zero dosage. These sparkling wines must simply be tasted to be believed!
2010 Recaredo “Relats” Brut Nature, Gran Reserva Penedes ($33.00)  Relats means “little stories in a bottle” and with its extensive 54 months of lees aging, Relats says a ton about depth and complexity.   A blend of  54% Xarel-lo and 46% Macabeo, this is the youngest cuvee made by Recaredo.   With rich brioche aromas, hints of nuts and toast, this bone-dry cava has a fine mousse of bubbles with staying power and elegance.
2008 Recaredo Terrers Brut Nature Gran Reserva, Penedes ($41.00)  46% Xarel-lo, 40% Macabeo, 14% Parellada, aged 71 months on the lees.  Fresh aromas of yellow apple are bright and creamy on the palate. Ripe white fruit has a hint of nuts and mineral and very fine bubbles, which end in a delicate crown.  Balanced acidity with a persistent finish, showing notes of almond and anise.  “… an elegant bouquet of white flowers, pears, apples and freshly-baked brioche, fresh and elegant, subtle, with a fresh palate with tiny, almost imperceptible bubbles that only seem to add freshness and texture, with clean flavors, superb acidity and balance. A great Cava at a bargain price. Drink now-2017.”  92 points WineAdvocate
Also available from our distributor (call or e-mail to order):
2006 Recaredo “Brut de Brut” Brut Nature Gran Reserva ($60.00)
2004 Recaredo “Particular” Brut Nature Gran Reserva ($115.00)

CHEESE PLEASE
   Infinitely variable in texture, flavor and unctuousness, cheese can play the meal’s starring role or be the fill-in workhorse.   Imagine an artisanal cheese platter accompanied by dried apricots or figs, charcuterie or nuts. Served with Recaredo cava, the seductive platter is a very romantic meal.
  Everyday quick and easy recipes like pizza, lasagna or toasted cheese sandwiches can be brightened up by using a different queso.   Variety is the spice of life; try one of the following tasty Iberian cheeses.
  One of our favorite meals in a hotel room is uber simple:  a selection of great cheeses and a bottle of wine.    This strategy is essential when restaurant options are poor.  Never leave home without emergency supplies!
Recommended Artisanal Cheeses:

Garroxta:  Goat milk.  Semi-hard and luscious, delicately flavored and smooth.   Excellent with cava!
Roncal:  Sheep milk. Made from raw milk of the Lacha and Aragonesa breeds that feed in high Navarran pastures.  Aged 6 months.  Intense flavors, nutty, with hint of mushroom.
Valdeon blue cheese:  Cow and goat milk.  Sweeter than Cabrales, it is smooth, rich and caramelized.
 
Olveha Amanteigado:  Portuguese sheep milk.  A non-DOP Serra de Estrela cheese, it is made with thistle rennet.  Unctuous and soft, sweet with hints of thistle.  Slice the top off this cheese and eat the center with a spoon.
Excellent Melting Cheeses:

Young Mahon: Cow’s milk.  Aged 4 months. Has a slight piquancy, with fruity, rich and nutty flavors.
Tetilla:  Cow’s milk.  Made in Galicia, the cows graze on lush grass and the cheese is aged 15-20 days.  Mild, buttery and semi-soft.
Palhais:  Goat milk.  From Portugal, semi-soft, crumbly and tangy.   Great stuffed inside piquillo peppers and warmed.
Great picnic cheeses:

Pata Cabra:  Goat milk. A washed-rind cheese from Aragon.  Fruity and refined when young, it develops tanginess with age.
El Valle Semi Curado:  Sheep milk.  Everyone knows Manchego sheep cheese from Spain, and we carry a selection from a number of producers.  El Valle is a non D.O. sheep milk cheese that is slightly creamier than Manchego, with fresh flavors of hay, and is a touch sharp.

Beira:  Cow’s milk.  From Portugal, near the Serra de Estrela mountains.  Flavorful, smooth and grassy.
Upcoming Paella class on Saturday March 19, 11-1 PM.
Details:  Hot Stove

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Filed under Catalan, Cava, Cheese, Events, Food, Jamon, Paella, Spain, Wine

Spanish Pantry Essentials

Not a fan of slogging through pounding rain to the grocery store?   Or don’t have time?   By keeping a few essential Spanish ingredients on hand, it’s easy to pull together a nutritious, tasty meal in a flash and save a run to the store.
Conservas are a must.  In Spain, vegetables are picked at their peak of flavor, roasted or simmered and then packed in jars or cans.   Equally delicious are a wide range of fish and shellfish, many packed in olive oil.  The oil can and should be used in recipes.
Rice is a versatile staple to have in the pantry.    Rice simmered with chorizo and jarred, roasted red peppers is delicious and quick to prepare.   If there is chicken in the frig, make a fast and toothsome rice soup with Aneto chicken broth, Spanish garbanzo beans and a sprinkling of dried lime.   Or, make a complete paella in 30 minutes with an Aneto Paella broth.   Choose from Seafood, Squid Ink or Valencian Paella; comes in easy to store tetra paks with a one year shelf life.     
In Spain, pasta called fideo is used to make a dish called fideau.   Fideo, simmered with broth in a paella pan, can be prepared in minutes by adding jarred ingredients.   For example, toss olive-oil packed Spanish tuna with strips of piquillo pepper, the oil from tuna, capers, water and pasta.
Or use Aneto Squid Ink Paella with fideo and revel in this different take on a traditional Spanish dish.   If Mac n’ Cheese is a favorite, upscale it.  Combine chicken stock with pasta and saffron; simmer until the pasta is done, then drain and stir in Manchego cheese to melt.
Gluten intolerant?    A jar of lentils, cooked with spicy chorizo makes a hearty and simple meal.   Canned mackerel or anchovies are fantastic tossed with lentils or white beans.
 
Got a freezer?  Store packages of Bilbao Chorizo, Chistorra or Morcilla for the right moment.  Scramble choistorra with eggs.  Grill chorizo and serve with de la Estancia organic polenta from Argentina which cooks in 3 minutes.  Just add grated Mahon cheese.
NEW!  Hernán products from Mexico, made by artisan producers.    Just arrived are Mole Poblano andMole Pipián sauces.   Mole Poblano is a blend of chiles and spices, tempered by an infusion of nuts, chocolate and other ingredients. Typically served on chicken or pork.   Mole Pipián contains roasted pumpkin seeds, sesame seeds and peanuts with spicy chiles and epazote and is excellent on fish.
  Hernán Mexican hot chocolate with cinnamon is now available, in powder and squares.
Brush up on Spanish with Spanish Circle on Wednesday evenings.  Held at the Seattle Public Library, 1000 Fourth Ave., Level 4, Room 1.  Jan 13-March 16 at 6 p.m.   Free!   For more information call 206.684.0849.

WINES
 
2013 Narupa Alala Albarino, Rias Baixas   ($26.99)   First vintage!  Sustainably produced from a 30 year old, family-owned vineyard planted by the winemaker’s Grandfather.  The grapes are pressed by foot and fermented with native yeast.  Raised in stainless steel with no malolactic fermentation, it has extended aging of one year to develop complexity.   Fresh aromatics with a hint of tropical fruit have notes of citrus and dust.   Mineral-laden with great mouthfeel and a pleasurable weight, this is a terrific expression of Albariño.   Limited availability – only 3 cases came to the state of Washinton, and we have 6 bottles.

2012 Carramimbre Roble, Ribera del Duero   

SALE!  Regular price $14.99, now $10.99  

We rediscovered this tasty gem last weekend, accompanied by a tapas assortment.  Versatile and nuanced, and it’s now 25% off!   (6 cases available).  90% Tempranillo, 10% Cabernet Sauvignon, aged four months in oak.  Offers up aromas of ripe blackberry, hints of earth and road tar, reminiscent of an old-school California Zinfandel.  Very smooth and full-bodied, it displays lifted notes of white pepper, tobacco leaf and mushroom.  Black fruit and mineral notes on the lengthy finish.   Decant for 20 minutes to fully release aromas and depth of flavors.

2012 Lagar de Robla Premium, Castilla y Leon ($10.99) 100% Mencia, aged about 18 months in oak.    Plush, with soft tannins and a hint of earth.   Round and smooth, Lagar de Robla is mineral-laden, with well-integrated notes of oak.   This is really good!   “This firm red is reserved, but shows depth and integration, with mulled plum, licorice, mineral and smoke flavors that mingle over well-integrated tannins, giving way to the juicy finish.”  91 points Wine Spectator

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Filed under Albariño, Catalan, Cheese, Chile, Fish, Food, Meat, Mencia, Paella, Recipes, Red Wine, Spain, Tempranillo, Uncategorized

Rabbit arrives

El conejo is integral to Spanish cuisine, particularly in the countryside where hunting traditions remain strong. Summer is rabbit hunting season and some of the compunction one may feel about eating our fluffy, floppy-eared friends is mitigated by the knowledge that they cause havoc in fields and vineyards. Reproducing with well-known enthusiasm, these conejos overrun woodlands and farms, damaging trees, helping themselves to Mr McGreggor’s vegetables, and foraging on the lesser known Mrs. Ribera del Duero’s vine shoots. So there you have it; my grand ethical argument in favor of rabbit consumption.

The culture of rabbit hunting is evident in many of the names given to traditional rabbit dishes in Spain: arroz a la cazadora (hunter’s rice with rabbit), liebre a la cazadora (hunter’s stew with hare), conejo a la brasa (grilled rabbit), and paella to name a few. The meat of good wild rabbits is suffused with the flavors of thyme and other herbs on which these animals feed. And while the farmed rabbits available in the US lack the same aromatic qualities, you can concoct a similar taste by cooking them with generous handfuls of herbs.

Since many of our favorite Spanish recipes call for rabbit, we are delighted to finally have this delectable meat for sale at The Spanish Table. Sourced from Nicky Farms in Oregon, the rabbit is farm raised on a diet of mixed grains supplemented with alfalfa producing unsurpassed flavor.  All Nicky’s rabbits are guaranteed antibiotic and hormone free. Sold whole, frozen.

  • Add to paellaconejo 1
  • Marinate in wine
  • Slow cook in a cazuela
  • Simmer into a ragout

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Bittman on Paella

Buenos Dias Dear Readers,

Looking for fresh ideas on pealla? Well known chef and food writer Mark Bittman takes on Spain’s most famous dish in the latest edition of the NYT Magazine.   Although we may differ on the specifics (water as the cooking liquid, ehem…I don’t think so) I do appreciate the way he breaks down the process and components. Call it paella or ‘rice with things’, its always a winner….. unless you make it with water, of course.

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/04/14/magazine/bittman-paella.html?ref=markbittman&_r=0

By Sam Kaplan for the New York Times; Food Stylist Susanne Lenzer; Prop Stylist Randi Brookman Harris.

By Sam Kaplan for the New York Times; Food Stylist Susanne Lenzer; Prop Stylist Randi Brookman Harris.

 

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Filed under Paella, Spain

A Tasmanian Brit takes on Spanish Paella

mybasquecuisinecover

“My Basque Cuisine” by Ash Mair

One of my lazy weekend pleasures is listening to Woman’s Hour on BBC Radio 4, a habit picked up while living in London. I potter about the kitchen making stock or trimming beans with half an ear cast towards the radio. It is an estimable program in which you find a satisfying balance of the serious and silly, the real and raw. From solemn discussions of women in politics to giddy gossips about the latest and greatest shade of lipstick, Woman’s Hour has it all. Among it’s many discussions, one of my favorites is a continuing segment entitled “Cook the Perfect,” in which  the presenter interviews a variety of chefs and takes the listener though the preparation of a chosen dish.

Recently, Woman’s Hour presented “Cook the Perfect Paella” with the Tasmanian born, Britain-based, Basque-loving chef Ash Mair. Click the link below for Mair’s tasty take on seafood paella with prawns, fennel, and aioli. Que rico! 

Cook the perfect….Paella

 

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Filed under Basque, Food, Paella

The secret life of saffron

Saffron – a spice as fine as a thread of silk and worth more than its weight in gold. The high price of this spice becomes understandable when you realize the intense labor that is required to harvest it. Those delicate sienna colored filaments are the stigmas of the Crocus sativus, also known as the saffron crocus.  Each thread must be carefully removed by hand and an amazing 150 flowers are required to produce one gram of dried saffron. Originating in Southwest Asia, saffron traveled westwards and north to become the prized spice it is today in Spanish cuisine.

Apart from imparting that gorgeous burnished orange hue to paellas, stews, seafood soups and more, saffron lends each of these dishes a warm, complex flavor that, in winter, always tugs me back to the soporific warmth of a sundried meadow.

People often walk into The Spanish Table, sniff the air reflectively, and comment that the whole stores smells of saffron. Indeed, we have a great supply of this edible gold – enough in fact to see us through a nuclear war. One must stock up on essentials.

Given its high price, there is a lot of fraudulent saffron on the market. Many countries to not have sufficient standards, allowing substitutes and fillers to be exported to the US and sold as ‘saffron.’ So it is important to know the origin of the saffron you purchase. If the price seems too good to be true it probably is. In Spain, however, the government rigorously tests saffron to be certain it is authentic. And at The Spanish Table we only sell high quality, genuine Spanish saffron.

We have three sizes on offer: 1 gram, 2 gram, or 4 gram. In terms of how many crocuses required, that’s 150, 200, or 600 flowers worth in each jar! Although not a cheap purchase, a little saffron goes a very long way; a tiny pinch of threads is sufficient for a family sized dish. Also, this spice has a shelf life of at least two years, considerably longer if you store it in a cool, dark, and dry place.

– Rachel Adams

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Filed under Food, Spain, Uncategorized

Rare Spanish Gran Reservas Arrive!

Spanish Table Seattle Newsletter

April 30, 2010

Last December for the first time, Bodegas Beronia opened their library of Gran Reserva Riojas for sale. Our special order of three historic vintages were shipped directly from Beronia’s cellars and arrived at Spanish Table yesterday.

Beronia was founded in 1973 by a gastronomic society and was conceived as a winery dedicated to quality, exclusively making Reservas and Gran Reservas, in the purest, most traditional Rioja style. In 1982, having exceeded its initial expectations, Beronia was acquired by Gonzalez Byass (producer of Tio Pepe sherry) who expanded production to include value priced Crianzas. (For those new to Rioja wines, the terms Crianza, Reserva and Gran Reserva refer to the aging process. Crianzas are wines matured for at least one year in oak cask and six months further in the bottle. Reservas are aged for at least three years total, with one year minimum in oak cask. Gran Reservas are produced only in great vintages and have been aged at least two years in oak casks and three years in bottle prior to release.) The Beronia Gran Reservas that we received have been aged much, much longer than a normal Gran Reserva, as they’ve been aging in the winery cellars since bottling. Ready to drink now, they would be excellent with a special Mother’s Day dinner, or as a gift.

1981 Beronia Gran Reserva ($54.00) is at its peak right now. A very good vintage, this is soft and balanced with great mouth feel. Dried fruit, leather, green tea, vanilla and dried tobacco aromas in this aged red wine.

1982 Beronia Gran Reserva ($72.00) is an impressive library offering from Rioja. A superb vintage, this is soft and balanced with great mouth feel. Sweet plum, cranberry and cherry, earth notes, vanilla and cigar box aromas in this impressively elegant aged red wine.

1994 Beronia Gran Reserva ($53.00) comes from one of the best vintages in the last several decades. Just starting to show its age with dried tobacco, baking spice, plum and dried red cherry. Nice weight and good balance. This is a treat.

Mothers Day is coming up (Sunday May 9th) and we’re stocked with gifts for cooks and specialty foods. Some gift ideas: Hand painted ceramics in various colors and shapes. Olive oil soaps from Spain and Greece scented with Magnolia or Lavender. Cookbooks are a terrific inspiration for the culinary minded. Our selection includes Spanish, Portuguese, Greek, Mexican, Turkish, Middle Eastern, Vegetarian, Cuban. Our latest favorite is Michael Psilakis’ “How to Roast a Lamb – new Greek cooking”. An assortment of extra virgin olive oils. If you’re serving brunch, pick up a rosé cava to add a celebratory touch.

NEW ARRIVALS

New shipment of Graupera cazuelas arrived today. Now in three colors: Clay, Dark Gray and Very Red. Limited quantities available of Very Red.

Ole Ole Fresh Sausages – No preservatives, no nitrates. Available in Butifarra, Merguez, Chorizo, and Chorizo Picante.

Fresh shipment of Spanish saffron arrived this week! We air freighted one and two gram plastic boxes of the latest harvest. 1 gram box: $10.99, 2 gram box: $19.49

MORE SPANISH TABLE WINES

1998 Señorio del Aguila Gran Reserva, Carineña ($19.99) Distributor close out! A blend of 60% Tempranillo, 20% Garnacha and 20% Cabernet Sauvignon, this food friendly red is perfectly aged. An earthy and medium-bodied wine, Señorio Del Aguila has notes of balsamic and spice. Red and black fruit with licorice flavors are balanced by silky tannins. Full of finesse, it is excellent with pork dishes.

2007 Beryna, Alicante ($19.99) Beryna is produced by a talented and enthusiastic team who bought a 19th century wine estate primarily planted with old vine Monastrell. 2007 Beryna has concentrated black cherry, dried plum and boysenberry flavors with drive and focus. Made of 60% Monastrell and 40% Tempranillo, Cabernet and Syrah, it has notes of chocolate and coffee. With superb lift, mineral notes and a persistent finish, this is a structured red that is excellent with barbequed rib-eye steaks or burgers. Very much like an old style Zinfandel! “Powerful, toasty” 92 points Guia Penin

2006 Riscal Tempranillo, Castilla y Leon ($9.99) Established in 1858, Rioja producer Marques de Riscal quickly became one of the most sought-after Spanish wines. Recently Riscal began producing table wines in Castilla y Leon, crafting value wines with the same care as their top Riojas. The 2006 Riscal is a well rounded Tempranillo with concentrated red fruit. Notes of cherries, raspberries, and cola are held together by soft velvety tannins, making it a perfect food wine. This is an excellent value!

2007 Goulart “The Marshall” Malbec, Argentina ($18.99) “The 2007 The Marshall “M” is 100% Malbec aged for 18 months in 40% new French oak. Opaque purple-colored, it offers up a nose of toasty new oak, cinnamon, allspice, violets, black cherry, and blackberry. On the palate it is rich, savory, and plush bordering on opulent. With excellent depth and grip, this substantial effort will evolve for another 2-3 years and offer prime drinking from 2011 to 2029.” 91 points Wine Advocate, 90 points Wine Spectator

VISIT US ON LINE!

Shop our wine website at Spanish Table Wines.

For food, cookbooks, paella pans and all non-wine items, go to The Spanish Table website.

For the latest product news from Paris Grocery, visit the PG Facebook page.

To subscribe to Paris Grocery’s newsletter, send an e-mail to info@parisgroceryseattle.com.

Have a great week and we’ll see you soon!

Sincerely,

Sharon Baden and Steve Winston, Owners

The Spanish Table, 1426 Western Avenue, Seattle WA 98101 phone# 206.682.2827

Paris Grocery, 1418 Western Avenue, Seattle WA 98101 phone# 206.682.0679

Hours at both stores: Monday- Saturday, 10 AM – 6 PM. Sunday 11 AM – 5 PM

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Filed under Argentina, Books, Cava, Food, france, Meat, Red Wine, Rose, Sherry, Spain, Uncategorized